nprglobalhealth:

An Ebola Quarantine In Freetown: People Come And Go As They Wish

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is spreading at an alarming rate. The death toll rose Monday to 900 when the World Health Organization reported 61 new deaths across four countries.

Here in the U.S., an American doctor is being treated for Ebola at an Atlanta hospital. And doctors in New York City are testing a man, who visited West Africa last month, for the virus at Mount Sinai Medical Center, the Associated Press reported Monday.

But Sierra Leone is one of the nations hardest hit by the outbreak. The country has reported more than 600 Ebola cases since late May.

In response, Sierra Leone’s president declared a state of emergency Wednesday and announced a series of hard-line measures designed to stop the spread of the disease. Among them was a 21-day quarantine on all homes exposed to the virus. Hundreds of military members were deployed Monday to enforce the quarantine.

But when I visited one of these homes in Sierra Leone’s capital city, Freetown, the atmosphere appeared relaxed. The home was guarded by only two police officers. People seemed to come and go as they pleased.

Sule Koroma and his family were placed under quarantine after his sister Saudatu Koroma died of Ebola in late July. She was the first resident in Freetown to test positive for the virus. And when Saudatu’s family forcibly took her out of the city’s hospital it triggered a manhunt.

Continue reading.

Top Photo: A neighbor talks to one of the two policemen assigned to enforce the quarantine of Sule Koroma’s house in Freetown, Sierra Leone.

Bottom Photo: Members of the Koroma family relax Sunday at their quarantined home in Freetown.

Photos by Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Does our collective empathy for children stop at the border? Read more of my HuffPost article here

#TBT - a photo from ChildFund’s archives. This photo of girls performing a dance was taken in 1982 at a home for children in Bangalore, India, that was supported by ChildFund International. 

#TBT - a photo from ChildFund’s archives. This photo of girls performing a dance was taken in 1982 at a home for children in Bangalore, India, that was supported by ChildFund International. 

What’s so scary about smart girls?

The question was posed by a donor representative speaking at the Girl Summit 2014 this week in London. The speaker’s answer to his own question – that smart girls can change the world – matched the mood of the event, which was upbeat, energetic, and ambitious in its goals. 

Girl Summit Should Lead to Action

(via humanrightswatch)

united-nations:

This week UN Member States proposed a set of Sustainable Development Goals to improve people’s lives and protect the planet for future generations. The proposed Goals cover a range of issues, including ending poverty and hunger, improving health and education, making cities more sustainable, combating climate change, and protecting oceans and forests.The proposal will now be considered by the UN General Assembly as part of the post-2015 development agenda that world leaders are expected to adopt at a Summit in September 2015. See the proposed Goals here: 

united-nations:

This week UN Member States proposed a set of Sustainable Development Goals to improve people’s lives and protect the planet for future generations. 

The proposed Goals cover a range of issues, including ending poverty and hunger, improving health and education, making cities more sustainable, combating climate change, and protecting oceans and forests.

The proposal will now be considered by the UN General Assembly as part of the post-2015 development agenda that world leaders are expected to adopt at a Summit in September 2015. 

See the proposed Goals here: 

We at ChildFund are shocked and saddened by the Malaysia Airlines MH17 crash and extend our thoughts and prayers to the families of those who were lost in this tragic event.