These pictures arrived this week from ChildFund’s office in Guinea, a country where the Ebola outbreak appears to be slowing, at least for now. A woman teaches her community how to prevent the spread of Ebola, and in the lower left corner, a man distributes bleach and other hygiene resources. The third picture shows another awareness-raising measure.

Nonetheless, community members — as well as the government and NGOs — continue to be vigilant, as the WHO warns that thousands more cases are expected in the region. You can read more about Guinea’s efforts here, and ChildFund’s response in the western Africa region, where the virus continues to claim the lives of thousands. 

nprglobalhealth:

Remembering Shacki: Liberia’s Accidental Ebola Victim
Sixteen-year-old Shacki Kamara was an accidental victim of Ebola. He didn’t die of the virus, but if the virus hadn’t struck Liberia, he might still be alive.
Kamara lived in West Point, a shantytown on a peninsula jutting out from the capital city of Monrovia. An Ebola holding center there was attacked on Aug. 16 and patients fled; on Aug. 20, the government imposed a lockdown.
Residents protested the next day, and clashed with security forces. During the unrest, Kamara was shot — apparently a single bullet wounded both legs. He lay in the street bleeding for at least 20 minutes. He was taken to Monrovia’s main medical teaching facility, JFK Hospital, but its emergency room had lost two doctors to Ebola and wasn’t able to care for him. So he was shuttled to Redemption Hospital, where he died on Aug. 22 from loss of blood and hypothermic shock.
Eva Nah raised Shacki from the age of 2. That’s when he lost his mother (her sister) and father.
His aunt, who’s 63, still asks: “Why?”
Nah had sent her nephew to buy tea for her breakfast on the morning of the protest. She says it was quiet when he went out on the errand. As she puts it, “He got caught up in the mix.”
"They shoot him; [they] shoot him foot," she says. The soldier’s bullet went through both legs and came out the front. "It bust the entire leg," Nah says.
Neighborhood children told her what had happened: “They shot Shacki. They shot Shacki.” Her oldest son confirmed the news. He had tried to run up to Shacki, telling the soldiers, “It’s my brother. I want to get my brother.”
The soldiers, he said, told him they’d shoot him if he came any closer.
Continue reading.
Photo: Eva Nah raised her nephew Shacki from the age of 2, when he lost his parents. “Every day [when] I wake up I cry because I feel bad that Shacki has left me,” she says. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR)

nprglobalhealth:

Remembering Shacki: Liberia’s Accidental Ebola Victim

Sixteen-year-old Shacki Kamara was an accidental victim of Ebola. He didn’t die of the virus, but if the virus hadn’t struck Liberia, he might still be alive.

Kamara lived in West Point, a shantytown on a peninsula jutting out from the capital city of Monrovia. An Ebola holding center there was attacked on Aug. 16 and patients fled; on Aug. 20, the government imposed a lockdown.

Residents protested the next day, and clashed with security forces. During the unrest, Kamara was shot — apparently a single bullet wounded both legs. He lay in the street bleeding for at least 20 minutes. He was taken to Monrovia’s main medical teaching facility, JFK Hospital, but its emergency room had lost two doctors to Ebola and wasn’t able to care for him. So he was shuttled to Redemption Hospital, where he died on Aug. 22 from loss of blood and hypothermic shock.

Eva Nah raised Shacki from the age of 2. That’s when he lost his mother (her sister) and father.

His aunt, who’s 63, still asks: “Why?”

Nah had sent her nephew to buy tea for her breakfast on the morning of the protest. She says it was quiet when he went out on the errand. As she puts it, “He got caught up in the mix.”

"They shoot him; [they] shoot him foot," she says. The soldier’s bullet went through both legs and came out the front. "It bust the entire leg," Nah says.

Neighborhood children told her what had happened: “They shot Shacki. They shot Shacki.” Her oldest son confirmed the news. He had tried to run up to Shacki, telling the soldiers, “It’s my brother. I want to get my brother.”

The soldiers, he said, told him they’d shoot him if he came any closer.

Continue reading.

Photo: Eva Nah raised her nephew Shacki from the age of 2, when he lost his parents. “Every day [when] I wake up I cry because I feel bad that Shacki has left me,” she says. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR)

In Liberia yesterday, ChildFund participated in an airlift of 15,000 pounds of emergency medical supplies for hospital workers coping with the deadly Ebola outbreak. Read more about the collaboration with other nonprofits, corporations and individuals here. 

In Liberia yesterday, ChildFund participated in an airlift of 15,000 pounds of emergency medical supplies for hospital workers coping with the deadly Ebola outbreak. Read more about the collaboration with other nonprofits, corporations and individuals here

Today, Halima’s first visit is with Nadzua, age 35, mother of 11; she is a second wife, married into a family who lost their mother to HIV. In her packed-dirt front yard, she greets Halima warmly, a sleepy toddler balanced on her hip. Her 2-year-old son, Mbega, is the only one of Nadzua’s children home this morning — the others are at school, and her husband is in town. Read more about HIV and AIDS in Kenya.

united-nations:

Different UN offices around the world marked World Humanitarian Day on Tuesday by paying tribute to aid workers who carry out life-saving activities, often in dangerous and difficult circumstances, while celebrating the spirit of humanitarian work worldwide.

The Day is observed annually on 19 August, the anniversary of the 2003 bombing of the UN headquarters in Baghdad that killed 22 people, including UN envoy Sergio Vieira de Mello.

Read more at: http://j.mp/1pII6Q7

Saturday was the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, and ChildFund’s blog post focuses on Bolivia, where nearly three out of four people belong to an indigenous group. Many countries where we work have significant indigenous populations, and they often face special challenges, including speaking languages other than the “official” tongue. Read more here. 

Saturday was the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, and ChildFund’s blog post focuses on Bolivia, where nearly three out of four people belong to an indigenous group. Many countries where we work have significant indigenous populations, and they often face special challenges, including speaking languages other than the “official” tongue. Read more here