ChildFund Alliance’s acting Secretary General Andrew Johnson speaks at the 46-minute point in this U.N. discussion, held this week in New York City. The Alliance supports including a goal to keep children free from violence in the U.N. post-2015 global agenda. 

The Clinton Global Initiative’s annual meeting in New York City always draws celebrities — including actor Matt Damon, speaking in his capacity as co-founder of Water.org about the dire need for clean water and sanitation worldwide — and President Bill Clinton, who posed for a quick photo with Anne, who sent these photos on her way back to Richmond. Stay tuned for her reflections on the meeting, and read here about the Procter & Gamble Company’s 2014 Social Sustainability Partnership Award, presented to ChildFund this week for our work administering the P&G Children’s Safe Drinking Water program. 

Don’t protect the past.
Don’t be defined by your product.
Start with changing yourself.
Ginni Rometty, first female chairman and CEO of IBM, speaking Monday at the Clinton Global Initiative conference in New York. Stay tuned for more notes from the event! 

We’re proud to be among the members of InterAction who are responding to the Ebola outbreak. Please read more here

These pictures arrived this week from ChildFund’s office in Guinea, a country where the Ebola outbreak appears to be slowing, at least for now. A woman teaches her community how to prevent the spread of Ebola, and in the lower left corner, a man distributes bleach and other hygiene resources. The third picture shows another awareness-raising measure.

Nonetheless, community members — as well as the government and NGOs — continue to be vigilant, as the WHO warns that thousands more cases are expected in the region. You can read more about Guinea’s efforts here, and ChildFund’s response in the western Africa region, where the virus continues to claim the lives of thousands. 

nprglobalhealth:

Remembering Shacki: Liberia’s Accidental Ebola Victim
Sixteen-year-old Shacki Kamara was an accidental victim of Ebola. He didn’t die of the virus, but if the virus hadn’t struck Liberia, he might still be alive.
Kamara lived in West Point, a shantytown on a peninsula jutting out from the capital city of Monrovia. An Ebola holding center there was attacked on Aug. 16 and patients fled; on Aug. 20, the government imposed a lockdown.
Residents protested the next day, and clashed with security forces. During the unrest, Kamara was shot — apparently a single bullet wounded both legs. He lay in the street bleeding for at least 20 minutes. He was taken to Monrovia’s main medical teaching facility, JFK Hospital, but its emergency room had lost two doctors to Ebola and wasn’t able to care for him. So he was shuttled to Redemption Hospital, where he died on Aug. 22 from loss of blood and hypothermic shock.
Eva Nah raised Shacki from the age of 2. That’s when he lost his mother (her sister) and father.
His aunt, who’s 63, still asks: “Why?”
Nah had sent her nephew to buy tea for her breakfast on the morning of the protest. She says it was quiet when he went out on the errand. As she puts it, “He got caught up in the mix.”
"They shoot him; [they] shoot him foot," she says. The soldier’s bullet went through both legs and came out the front. "It bust the entire leg," Nah says.
Neighborhood children told her what had happened: “They shot Shacki. They shot Shacki.” Her oldest son confirmed the news. He had tried to run up to Shacki, telling the soldiers, “It’s my brother. I want to get my brother.”
The soldiers, he said, told him they’d shoot him if he came any closer.
Continue reading.
Photo: Eva Nah raised her nephew Shacki from the age of 2, when he lost his parents. “Every day [when] I wake up I cry because I feel bad that Shacki has left me,” she says. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR)

nprglobalhealth:

Remembering Shacki: Liberia’s Accidental Ebola Victim

Sixteen-year-old Shacki Kamara was an accidental victim of Ebola. He didn’t die of the virus, but if the virus hadn’t struck Liberia, he might still be alive.

Kamara lived in West Point, a shantytown on a peninsula jutting out from the capital city of Monrovia. An Ebola holding center there was attacked on Aug. 16 and patients fled; on Aug. 20, the government imposed a lockdown.

Residents protested the next day, and clashed with security forces. During the unrest, Kamara was shot — apparently a single bullet wounded both legs. He lay in the street bleeding for at least 20 minutes. He was taken to Monrovia’s main medical teaching facility, JFK Hospital, but its emergency room had lost two doctors to Ebola and wasn’t able to care for him. So he was shuttled to Redemption Hospital, where he died on Aug. 22 from loss of blood and hypothermic shock.

Eva Nah raised Shacki from the age of 2. That’s when he lost his mother (her sister) and father.

His aunt, who’s 63, still asks: “Why?”

Nah had sent her nephew to buy tea for her breakfast on the morning of the protest. She says it was quiet when he went out on the errand. As she puts it, “He got caught up in the mix.”

"They shoot him; [they] shoot him foot," she says. The soldier’s bullet went through both legs and came out the front. "It bust the entire leg," Nah says.

Neighborhood children told her what had happened: “They shot Shacki. They shot Shacki.” Her oldest son confirmed the news. He had tried to run up to Shacki, telling the soldiers, “It’s my brother. I want to get my brother.”

The soldiers, he said, told him they’d shoot him if he came any closer.

Continue reading.

Photo: Eva Nah raised her nephew Shacki from the age of 2, when he lost his parents. “Every day [when] I wake up I cry because I feel bad that Shacki has left me,” she says. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR)